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Full Moon

Southern Hemisphere

11:11:11



The Art of Timing:

GARDENING BY THE MOON

 

Briefly, a good rule of (green) thumb for gardeners who want to utilise the moon’s power is to transplant seedlings during the 1st and 2nd quarters of the moon. Prune on a waxing moon to stimulate growth and on a waning moon to retard growth. On a waxing moon graft during a fertile sign for best healing and irrigate in water signs for best results. During the waxing moon is also the best time to apply foliar or soluble fertilizer. Wait until after the full moon, during a waning moon, to apply organic manure.

 

Harvesting

Herbs to be used for medicinal and magical purposes are best when gathered before midday in dry weather, during the waxing or the Full Moon, and traditionally should only be cut with a knife made from a silver blade with a black handle – although I’ve found that a copper blade also works well.  The reason for harvesting at this time is because the water content of the plant is at its height and in harmony with the tides of the oceans, so the plant is more succulent, more energised and more potent.

 

Planting

Long ago, before multinationals and genetic engineers took over our food production, people worked the land knew about the influence of the phases of the moon on crops.  Farmers planted for success not only according to the season, but also according to the phase of the moon. You can also fine-tune your gardening success by noting where the moon is in the skies before you plant or transplant.

  • If it is the first week of the lunar month, also called the First Quarter which is just after the Dark Moon, the Moon's energy is high and the plant's moisture is in the leaves, so plant leafy annuals or those plants where you want to harvest the foliage.
  • The next lunar week also called the Second Quarter falls after the Quarter Moon, when the moon's energy sinks further down so the plant's energy goes to the seeds. During the Second Quarter is a good time to plant fruiting annuals, or those plants where you want to harvest the seeds.
  • After the Full Moon during the Third Quarter which is the third week of the lunar month the Moon's energy sinks even lower, so plant root crops and perennials.
  • During the Fourth Quarter, the week leading up to the Dark Moon, take a rest and give your garden a rest too. If you must work, do maintenance and get rid of pests.

Here's a quick planting guide to help you sort out your seedlings for maximum success, remembering to also plant according to your local climate. For example, it's not a good idea to plant tomatoes anywhere in Australia during January or February even if it is the Second Quarter because it's just too hot for the plants to thrive. Best to wait until July in cold or temperate areas, and until March in the tropics and sub-tropics.

Quick Planting Guide

1st quarter

leafy annuals

2nd quarter

fruiting annuals

3rd quarter

root crops & perennials

Annual flowers

Artichokes

Asparagus

Basil

Broccoli

Brussels sprouts

Cabbage

Cauli

Celery

Cereal grains

coriander

Cress

Cucumbers

Dill

Fennel

Hay

Kale

Kohl rabi

Leeks

Lettuce

Melons

Oilseeds

Parsley

shallots

Silverbeet

Spinach

Annual flowers

Beans

Capsicum

Cereal grains

Chokos

Corn

Cucumbers

Eggplant

Gourds

Hay

Leeks

Marrows

Melons

Oilseeds

Okra

Peas

Pumpkin

shallots

Squash

Tomatoes

Zucchini

Beetroot

Berries

bulbs

Carrots

Chickory

Garlic

Ginger

Onion

Parsnip

Potatoes

Radish

Rhubarb

Shrubs

Sweet potatoes

Trees

Turnips

Vines

Note: Italics indicate that you can plant successfully in the 1st or 2nd quarter